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>>> this week on the i had for yal report. states are paying. california, new jersey and new york all on the brink of insolvency after decades of failed policies is. federal government headed down the same path? as they work to push a climate bill. a look at the true cost of cap and trade and how things look. and banning the burka, muslim validate isn't welcome in his country. the journal editorial reported starts right now. >>> welcome to the journal editorial ri port. i'm paul gigot. new jersey, california and new york a decade ago was among
, visit keplers.com. >>> miriam greenburg is the author brand in new york our city in crisis was sold to the world is the book. profs miriam greenberg, when you think of the 50's and 60's what do you think of? >> well, i feel that world war ii in the post -- new york in the post world war ii was in the pre-eminence in the united states and its fortunes were rising for a time. i a famous kind of working-class city to quote another book by joshua freeman. it was a city that had a lot of business during world war ii and its industries had been employed in many many new yorkers and was also a growing media capital. it was expanding its office infrastructure. it was growing in terms of the sighting of the united nations. it was getting a lot of international attention and a new way politically and it was part of, you know, it was seen internationally as the kind of capital of research of the u.s. following world war ii. yes, very much so so the star was rising in that period. >> what happened to new york in the 1970's? >> well, it's a complicated question that has global, national, local r
you [applause] >> host: miriam greenberg is the of third "branding new york" how a city and crisis was sold to the world did you think of new york city in the '50s and '60s what do think of? >> guest: i think in new york and the post-world war two period was in a position of pre-eminence in the united states and its fortunes were rising it was a famous working-class city to quote another book by joshua freeman, it was a city that had a lot of business during world war ii and the industries were employing many, many new yorkers and it was also a growing media capital. and it was expanding the office infrastructure, a growing in terms of the of united nations and getting a lot of international attention in a new way politically and seen internationally as the capital of a resurgent u.s. following world war ii. the star was rising during that period. >> host: what happened to new york in the 1970's? >> guest: a complicated question that has global, national, local reasonings behind it. political and economic and cultural it was a period of crisis. on many levels. it was a period that
, he could have recall the cornwallis entirely to a new york which is probably what he should have done. he knew as early as june that cornwallis was in virginia and, in fact, by late may or the first of june he knew that cornwallis was in virginia and at some point during the summer he gets intelligence reports that indicates that they are bringing the french fleet from the caribbean north. he doesn't know where he is coming but he knows he is coming to the north and he guessed that they were coming to new york and he thought that there would be a campaign that rochambeau and washington would try to take new york and he could have recall the clinton -- cornwallis at that point to new york. he did and i think in part because he expected some reinforcements from the caribbean himself up which he got then turned out to be useless because washington did not attack me york but he did get those reinforcements and he thought there would be adequate but also because he was confident that the allies in just could not succeed in an attack on york. that he had the capability to repulsed an attack
had for yal report. states are paying. california, new jersey and new york all on the brink of insolvency after decades of failed policies is. federal government headed down the same path? as they work to push a climate bill. a look at the true cost of cap and trade and how things look. and banning the burka, muslim validate isn't welcome in his country. the journal editorial reported starts right now. >>> welcome to the journal editorial ri port. i'm paul gigot. new jersey, california and new york a decade ago was among the states most prosperous but after progressive tax policies they are on now on the brink of insolvency. california has begun to hand out ious to its creditors. doesn't sound good for the rest of the country but is the federal government headed down to the same road? here is deputy editor dan hairringter and steve moore. you paid a lot of attention to all these states. what policies do they have in common? >> the wheels have come off in california, new jersey an new york. none of them can pay their bills. california is sending out ious. first time in that h
things for any easier for the thousands of men left behind and new york churches in the bridewell or provost or city hall or the sugarhouses. private thomas dewitt of west koln pennsylvania recalled worms and food, putrid water, random fogging and the gaging odor of urine and excrement and so much sickness burial party is looking of ten or 20 bodies every morning. henry franklin a quaker who visited the north dutch church only two days after the fall of fort washington testified that the men were already fighting over scraps. those who were modest and backward, he added, could get little or none. captain edward baliles been snatched by the tories near his new trustee, engine debris 1777 found himself in livingston sugarhouse here he wrote was such a filthy state of things there wasn't a place to lie down for rest day or night upon the excrements of the prisoners. and to sleep was almost certain death. with yellow fever, want and suffering the prisoners were donner and constantly and it was impossible to move about without stumbling over the dead and dying. one of the bridewell inm
seconds. >> mr. president, i yield 10 minutes to senator schumer from new york. >> senator is recognized to make thank you mr. president and i would like to thank all of my colleagues who are working with us on this amendment, the senator from california who has been such a leader on these issues and will speak after me and she and i were commenting that this is probably the most dangerous piece of legislation to is the safety of americans when it comes to guns since the repeal of the assault weapon ban which she led the charge on to pass. i like to thank my colleague from new jersey senator lautenberg has been a leader on gun issues and then such a great job, mr. menendez, senator gillibrand, senator durbin was so many others working with us today on this issue. now today we are here to say in that we urge all of our colleagues thought to oppose this legislation. , the legislation would do nothing less then take state and local gun laws and tear them up. it would take the carefully crafted gun laws in york and tear them up. it would do the same in 47 other states. and the great irony of
i want to campaign to take new york city. he argued with washington, we can't succeed there. we cannot succeed in an attack on new york city. the british have held the too long. they have had six years to prepare their defense is. we cannot win. but he had been ordered by lilly t-16, his washington show, defer to washington, do what he wants to do so after the wethersfield conference-- at the wethersfield conference, he agreed, okay we will attack new york and washington wrote back to west point, thinking that would be the next item on the agenda. but, as soon as washington wrote-- rhoda way, he went to his desk and he wrote to the admiral of the french fleet in the caribbean asking him to bring his sleek north, not to new york as washington expected, but to the chesapeake, because roshambeau saw the british army in virginia and he saw the possibility of trapping it, and that was exactly what happened. one last thing very quickly, and that is there has been a debate really sends the moment of the peace settlement ending the war over whether britain could have won this war. for a
possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermt, and honolulu, the newman's own foundation, the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small business to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> killed at birth friday prayers. bombers attacked five shia mosques in iraq. at least 30 are dead. nigeria's interior minister tells us there will be an investigation into the controversial killing of an islamist military leader. >> what is important is that we have acted swiftly, have succeeded. >> a british man loses his latest bid to avoid extradition to the united states. welcome to "bbc world news," broadcasting to our viewers in the united states on pbs and around the globe. coming up, the photographers behind the most iconic shots of the century, who are fighting a losing battle against technology. and baseball on valium or a chance to build bridges in new york? the story of cricket, the nypd, and the big apple's muslims. >> it may
authors law and commuters really lie but it really is about half an hour away from new york, 40 minutes at the most. a green leafy suburb with ponds, sometimes in the summer frog's leap on your foot, little league team. it is a very calm and pleasant place but has a strange side that people don't acknowledge very much harry stein's title. so why don't you tell us the title and go from there? >> guest: welcome the title is "i can't believe i'm sitting next to a republican," which is what somebody said to me at a dinner party. i had been searching for a title of this book which is being a red state type of conservative and a blue state new york and it was a book about those kind of people, people like us who are essentially despised by our neighbors. >> host: you encounter this because everyone assumes you are a fellow liberal and have received wisdom you get from where? >> guest: "the new york times" principally but you know, these things are handed down. and assumed to be a given. i started out as a liberal and was a liberal most of my life and when i made that transition i found a lot
's why new york life has been helping families plan for the expected and unexpected for 164 years. backed by the highest ratings for financial strength. we're safe and secure. yr beoofa your family the gift of a secure financial future. new york le. the company you keep. >> a small plane crash near an oklahoma city highway killing one person and critically injurying another. it looked like the pilot w trying to land. it crashed on the road. >> investigators are still gathering evidence at the scene. an aaron airlines flight returned to boston. it was heading to puerto rico. someone smelled smoke in the bathroom. the passengers were put on other flights while maintenance workerscam ined the -- scam ined the plane. >> sarah palin spent her last day in office sharing with fellow members. >> protesters gathered in front of the new jersey mayor calling for him to redesign. prosecutors say he took thousands of dollars. he took off earlier this month. he says he's innocent. >> a lightening strike targeted a woman's car while she was driving down the highway. they were driving through fort lauder
in a wrong-way crash on a new york parkway. >>> and stormy summer, dangerous hit-and-miss storms pummelled the atlantic coast. >> it's crazy. captioning funded by cbs >>> good morning and thanks for joining us. i'm michelle gielan. this morning folks from virginia to new england are cleaning up after a string of severe but fast-moving storms that left a trail of damage. susan roberts is in washington with the latest. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. we certainly felt it here in washington over the weekend. the storms were powerful but isolated. they made their way with damaging winds up through the coast over the weekend. >> oh, my god. i've never seen anything like this in my entire life, in this area specifically. like a monsoon came through. >> reporter: the worst of the storms roared through late yesterday. heavy flooding, rain, hail and gusting winds that toppled trees and power lines. four people were struck by lightning in new jersey. >> i couldn't believe all the trees were down in the middle of the street and my next door neighbor has a whole tree across his house, like ri
over new york and into connecticut. some areas could pick up 1 to 2 inches of rain. so the heaviest rains today, really new york city through glue england. the southeast, not bad. temperatures in the mid-80s. a sun and cloud mix. here's a look at the weather outside your window. >>> that heavy rain should move into hartford sometime probably mid-morning to late morning and then continue during the afternoon. definitely bring your umbrella today anywhere in new england. areas to the south look dry. >>> dan, another cool day for areas from chicago to new york. this july is starting to feel like the year without a summer. >> but you know what? we're going to get hit in august, september, october, right? >> we'll see. >> right? all right, no guarantees. thank you, bill. >>> hopeful signs spark stocks, gas prices plummet and bellies and baseball. your early morning business headlines straight ahead. >>> plus, her agent made her out to be a victim in her contract snit with "american idol" producers. but are diva demands really to blame? >>> high drama in the yankees' game. can anybody bea
they are starting to write. they write books for the. >> host: guide to new york and also riding fiction and developing their own voices. in the fifties allison invisible man comes out and really captures a whole passage to american life that people had not seen before. meanwhile in the '30's and jim thompson also raised in oklahoma city has his own troubles back of his father a deputy sheriff in a little town outside oklahoma city. he lost his shirt and bad investments in the oil industry. filed jim thompson is still and high-school he supports the family working at a sleazy hotel basically printing and drug dealing doing anything to help the families stay afloat just after the crash in the late twenties and early 30's. he gets to college will pass to drop out and winds up back in oklahoma city where writing for a magazine with true crime stories and barely able to support his wife and young child. he learned about the writers' project and gets a job with the oklahoma project and soon he is driving routes across the state for the guide to oklahoma and he is finding the holdout of the da
when they pass over a 100-year-old new york city bridge. >>> and flip out. things go spectacularly wrong at a washington state boat race. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> this is "early today" for tuesday, jewel 28th, 2009. hello and good morning, everyone. i'm dan kloeffler. today we begin with the michael jackson mystery. law enforcement sources tell nbc news that michael jackson's doctor administered a powerful drug the night the late pop star died. those sources confirm dr. murray did give jackson the prescription sedative. according to the associated press, jackson regularly relied on the drug to sleep with doctors, then stopping the intravenous drip in his room whenever it was time for jackson to wake up. still, we do not know exactly what killed jackson. toxicology results have not been released. they are expected later this week. >>> federal officials say seven men in north carolina was ind t indicted of planning a coup overseas. boyd is accused of encouraging others to engage in jihad, offering military-style travel and offering money to aid overseas trav
of traffic? >> new york avenue is closed in each direction. new york avenue is not going to be an option for you until further notice. that is a huge deal. rhode island avenue, go down to east capitol street. but new york avenue is not an option in and out of town. this is a new development. i will take you live to springfield. look in the camera. quiet traffic in both directions in springfield, virginia. now with top stories. >> thank you. >>> we begin with a deadly hit- and-run accident that tied up the beltway while you were sleeping. >> two people were killed. the suspect hit a car about 11:00 p.m. last night near the american legion bridge and then drove away. two people died. the suspect kept going into virginia, causing another accident. fortunately, no one was hurt in the second accident. >>> the rock creek parkway had to be shut down briefly overnight after a car flipped over into the creek. the 40-year-old woman was rescued. we have no word on her condition. >>> to our other top stories. a dramatic development in the stocking accusations facing marion barry. >> the woman who ma
, agitator and theoretician of the socialist party of new york. the founder of the new negro movement and its first organization, the liberty league and first newspaper, the waste. the editor of the movement's negro world and principal radical influence on the garvey movement. in addition, harrison was a self-described radical internationalist and he was extremely knowledgeable vietnam era and writer in order or on a africa, asia, the middle east, caribbean, latin america and the muslim world. he was also a union organizer for the afl, the hotel workers and pullman porters, postal unionist and prominent iww supporters and speaker of the 1913 paterson silk strike. he was a pioneer black activist in the free thought and birth control movements. he was a leader in urging the development of race conscious independent political voice for black people and urging support of black candidates responsive to the black community. in urging support for new york city's first elected black official and its importing a black candidate to run for president of the united states in 1920. harrison is a key figur
little storm? >> reporter: late saturday, a tornado touched down near buffalo, new york, leaving a four-mile wide footprint. one business was destroyed and more than a dozen homes damaged but no injuries, saturday night in washington with storms made for a brilliant light show near the capital. and it looks like it's not over yet. the northeast expects more powerful storms throughout the week. michelle? >> all right. susan, thank you. >>> sarah palin wakes up this morning as the ex-governor of alaska. palin officially stepped down yesterday vowing to fight fors what right and for the truth. but as bill whitaker reports, the truth about why she left the state house in juneau is unclear and so is her next move. >> people who know me and they know how much i love this state, some still are choosing not to hear why i made the decision to chart a new course to advance the state. and it should be so obvious to you. it is because i love alaska this much, sir. >> reporter: sarah palin handed the reigns of power to lieutenant governor. >> with this decision i'll be able to fight harder for you.
jobs in the world. the search for explosive devices in afghanistan. welcome to the "new york times" hour here on msnbc. i'm john harwood of cnbc and "the new york times." >> i'm norah o'donnell and welcome to the "new york times special edition." on today's front page, house panels approve health plans. in both the house ways and means committee, they crossed party lines. this follows the approval of the plan earlier this week. the plan stands at 3-5. also, the energy and commerce committee in the house and senate finance are the two panels still left without a finished bill, promising progress by next week. >> it remains to be seen if health care will be a bipartisan bill. i sat down with senator chris dodd to talk about it. here's what he had to say. >> does it look clear to you at this point that this is in the end, going to be a democratic bill that goes through the reconciliation process? think it will be? >> not necessarily. we're sitting in a room here where a few weeks ago i got out the credit card bill. in a week or two, it passed 90-5. would i prefer bipartisan? you bet i
or not this was the time to make that big of a deal. but he's just home from china, just home from new york, all he wanted to do was get to bed, his door was jammed, and so, he was in a mood where he said -- >> larry: are there those who say he brings the whole history into that body of a black movement? >> that may well be the case. but i still think that it might well have been resolved in a different manner if we didn't have this verbal altercation between the two of them. my first teaching point for young people, especially, not for dr. gates, but for young people especially is when the police are looking into something and you're involved in it in one way or another, cooperate. don't make the situation more difficult. and i think in this case, the situation was made more difficult. on the part of the cambridge police department, once they felt they had to bring dr. gates out of the house and to handcuff him, i would have thought at that point some adult supervision would have stepped in and said, okay, look, it is his house. come on. let's not take this any further. take the handcuffs off. good night
will hear from dr. marcy from new york. >> good morning. i don't have any slides which is unusual for me and i am a new yorker so i talk fast. a lot of people have talked about the importance of planning and i am definitely a proponent of emergency response planning ahead of time and ironically we were in the midst of finalizing a revision of the 2006 pandemic plan this spring when the h1n1 outbreak of life in new york city and although overall the planning process for pandemic helped the response this spring there were definitely several assumptions that ended up not being applicable to this particular outbreak. first, we thought we would have morning ahead of time a pandemic was occurring and that it was more likely to be recognized overseas prior to its arrival in new york city and second, we were preparing for the worse case scenario in 1918 like pandemic and we thought that we would be able to address my older for the worst-case scenario but we hadn't thought through in enough detail how we might need to modify our actions fortunately and new york city we were able to identify the i
? did you know it's free over there? before we trash our current system, in new york state, they heaped nearly a 60% tax on the rich to pay for healthcare. put this in perspective. you're making $1. this is what you keep -- i'm sorry. this is what goes there. this is what you keep and you can spend. i mean, shouldn't we ask ourselves who in this country is going to innovate? you know, greed is a bad thing, but a little bit of a greed is a good thing. somebody saying gee, if i fix that, i could get rich. i got an idea, why don't i fix that? wake up, america. this is turning into a country i don't even recognize anymore. our grandparents left europe. they packed up everything that they owned. they left family and friends behind. they got on the ships and they came here to america to dream, to be free. they came to embrace the entrepreneurial spirit. they didn't come here and risk everything and work their butts off only to have our dopey politicians in washington say, you know, the mother country was pretty great. our government is giving them the very government programs they were runnin
would think that anybody could take that shot. however, if you work in new york it's a rainy day, you need a shot of the american flag in five minutes. that's where i come in because my shot is the perfect shot of the american flag. no tears, no wrinkles. just perfect blowing in the wind. and on a larger bases, if you really think about it, for a guy that presumably loves america, and he wants to photograph democracy, in some ways it just seems right that my biggest selling shot would be an american flag. now i wouldn't tell a european that. [laughter] >> well, thank you very much. i appreciate it. [applause] >> joseph sohm's voters have been published over 50000 times in national geographic time, "the new york times," the washington post and others. for more information visit visions of america.com. >> with the birth of a continental army in 1775 local militias were organized under the leadership of george washington that begin an eight year engagement that would be known as the american revolutionary war. despite the outcome, it was not by all historical accounts a model of tactical
.s. military has a new strategy for troops in afghanistan. the family tragedy occurred on a yor york highwa york hi julie loves target, it's got the supplies teacher told her to get and for a great deal. she also expects he'll love the sandwich. she expects he'll think of her when he sees the note. so she shops target. gotta have deals on the stuff she's gotta get. target. expect more. pay less. ...or if you're already sick... ...or if you lose your job. your health insurance shouldn't either. so let's fix health care. if everyone's covered, we can make health care as affordable as possible. and the words "pre-existing condition" become a thing of the past... we're america's health insurance companies. supporting bipartisan reform that congress can build on. >> eight people, including four children, are dead after a fiery clash on it -- a fiery crash on a parkway in new york city. >> several people were ejected, most of them children. >> investigators say that a minivan was heading the wrong way in the northbound lanes of the parkway when it crashed head-on into an suv a third car was also
in chicago, detroit and st. louis. a humid 88 in new york. and 83 in boston. >>> coming up, sand survey. the most and least polluted beaches in the u.s. >>> and falling fares. finding a bargain is easier than it has been in years. >>> plus, the coroner has finished the report into michael jackson's death. so, why isn't it being released? it's much easier to find money at esurance. great auto insurance rates and lots of discounts! got insurance already? save more with esurance's "switch & save (tm) discount"! it also pays to shop online. you get esurance's "fast 5 (tm) discount" just for getting an instant online quote. - thanks, professor. - don't forget the good student discount. and there's even more discounts! it's no "secret" that you can save hundreds with esurance. make it your "mission" to click or call esurance today. >>> new numbers out this morning show the foreclosure crisis is most heavily concentrated in the sun belt. more than one-third of all foreclosure filings during the first half of the year came from cities in the sun belt. but above-average foreclosure activity in s
washington post" and the "new york times," they have a whole team. you have the goods to do that online? >> what we don't have is those budgets to have those investigate every teams. i believe it'll happen because we're in a terrifying transitional stage where that business model is not there. but what we are doing, it is exciting, you could have a virtual news team all over the world. we have had extraordinarily good rigorous factual foreign reporting from everywhere, from right as it were developing in those places. i don't think it has to necessarily be done from the head office like it used to be. >> the great thing about the mornings for most of us is to get up and dawn, and with the coffee, we read a couple of good papers. when you look out in the driveway and there's nothing there, where will we be? >> we're going to be on the internet. in my own world, do i both. i have the sense while i love picking up the "new york times" and "the washington post" in the morning, i already read what is in them on my blackberry the night before because i'm a news junky and log in. i know the ne
the streets of new york and you'll see. >> i remember growing up with my dad, he'd hit some things. i heard the words and i think he decreased the pains. >> let's bring in rick. we have to tell you what rick's going to do at the end of the show because it's going to keep you tuned to our station throughout. he's going to kiss a seal later. is that right? >> that's what they tell me. >> isn't he married? (laughter) >> ah! >> happily. don't you love when you spend all this money on these studies that we could have told them obviously that's what happens. like you feel better if you swear. >> (bleep). >> just call dave briggs. he would have told you it works. >> the study if you're a night owl you do better at night. if you're a morning person you do better in the morning. >> ahhhh! >> what's the shark behind you there? >> i know. right now we're is he shark tank and at the new york aquarium. zoos and aquariums, all about conservation but a lot had coming under the gun for financial problems. new york has come one a unique way to make money. take a quick look at the weather maps. we have a cou
>>> good evening from the cbs news control center in new york. >> he was the most trusted man in america, who put the anchor in anchorman. >> the eagle has landed. >> oh, boy. boy. >> through good times and bad, for 19 years, he gave america what it needed most, the truth. >> that's the way it is. >> today we pay tribute to walter cronkite, early this saturday morning, july 18th, 2009. captioning funded by cbs >>> and hi everyone. welcome to this very special edition of "the early show" on a saturday morning. i'm chris wragge write with maggie rodriguez. a sad moment in a storied news division here in cbs but also a celebration of the most trusted man in america. >> yes, we're going to spend the next two hours remembering walter cronkite by doing what he did best telling stories. we're going to tell his personal and professional stories. we're going to hear them from the people who knew him best the people who worked with him or were influenced by him quite a lineup, morley safir, leslie stahl, roger mudd harry smith, the list goes on and on and on. >> an
condition. >>> there's some tense moments in new york when a barge used in saturday night's fireworks exploded. no one was injured. but the cause of the fire now still under investigation. >>> and the streets in seattle looked like they were overcome by hordes of the undead. participants came out lurching and bloody, fake blood, of course, to try for the largest zombie walk. still don't know whether the current record of 4,000 zombies was broken. . >>> and now nor a look at the national and regional weather, here's nbc's meteorologist talktodd santos with the weather channel forecast. >> who knew you would be dressed up as a zombie instead of george washingt washington. >> they had elvis in there. >> elvis is a true patriot. but zombies, i don't know. we'll leave it up to your interpretation there. of you may want to dress up in the southeast. this is likely the story in the weekend. a rain coat through some spots. out to the west, notice a few isolated thunderstorms. nothing that widespread. but certainly looking at still a chance for pretty strong storms, especially through montana
. and a trash remover in new york came across a very valuable rubbish. amidst the garbage in a deceased man's apartment, he came across mayan artifacts. they could be worth tens ofousa >>> and in north carolina, a student was arrested for harmless but very illegal art. take a look at this one. using stolen construction barrels, he created this barrel monster. he was, however, later sentenced to 50 hours of community service. he said he plans to resurrect the monster but next time he will buy the barrels. >>> now for a look at your national and regional weather, here's nbc meteorologist bill karins with the weather channel forecast. good morning, bill. another form of punishment could be making him sit in traffic. >> it could. all the people that got caught because the cones were stolen. that would make sense. christina, it's a cool summer. in many areas from the great lakes, really from chicago through the great lakes, through new england, yesterday was just an example of another day that didn't feel like summer. it was only 67 in boston yesterday, 71 in new york, 76 in detroit. even the so
of my time. the chair: the gentlewoman from new york. ms. velazquez: mr. chairman, i yield to the gentlelady from illinois, mrs. halvorson, for four minutes. the chair: the gentlewoman from illinois is recognized for four minutes. mrs. halvorson: thank you, mr. chair. i rise today in support of h.r. 2965, the enhancing small business research and innovation act. i want to thank chairwoman velazquez, ranking member graves, and mr. altmire, for their leadership on this important piece of legislation. i'm proud to be an original co-sponsor of this bill which includes language from legislation i introduced in h.r. 2747, the rural technology development and outreach act. for nearly three decades, the small business innovation research program has sought to increase federal funding for innovative small businesses that seek to develop new technology with commercial potential. without funding assistance from sbir, many small businesses would never have the opportunity to develop their research into products that can be brought to market. over the years, sbir has helped build thousa
for each worker! number 6 -- 55 has triggered a legal battle in rochester -- rochester, new york where a teacher is suing the school district over the misuse of $30 million in stimulus funds. the teacher says the money was supposed to create jobs but the district recently fired 230 teachers. number 54 is one of the most irresponsible wastes of your tax dollars on the list. in arizona, over $700,000 is being spent to fund treatment for meth addsicts. i thopt joe biden was supposed to prevent ridiculous projects like this from receiving funds. number 53, all about reviving the great heritage of buffalo, new york. $4.4 million will be used to recreate a historic water fropt in the city. call me a cynic but i don't know how many people are going to be enjoying those cobblestone streets when they're buried under snow for that of the -- half the year. number 52, to college park, maryland where the university of maryland intends to secure $2.5 money to pay for up to eight anti-crime security cameras. taxpayers are fighting the proposal, saying the cameras are a violation of civil liberties. t
, but this dispute has as "the new york times" put it this morning, reignited a national discussion about the relationship between race and law enforcement. >> mike, thank you for that. we're just learning now from the massachusetts news wires, that a black police officer who was with, at the home when gates was arrested, says he supports 100% how his white fl low officer handled the situation. >> let's bring in kevin sack of "the new york times," who won a pulitzer prize a few years ago. thanks for being with us. let me ask you from your experience in that series, how universal are experiences of the kind that skip gates and this police officer had in cambridge? that is mutual misunderstanding. skip gates thinks there was profiling involved. does this happen thousands of times every day across this country? >> i can't come up with a count, but i think it is common place and if you talk to african-americans in this country, they'll tell you so. what was fascinating about this situation and particularly the president's involvement is that like so many of our racial flash points in the rece
gathered today to discuss this topic for the first is dr. rachel ehrenfeld the director of the new york based american center for democracy and the center of the study of corruption and rule of law. the author of "funding evil" how terrorism is financed and how to stop it" and "narcoterrorism". dr. ehrenfeld and authority of the movement of funds and finding terrorism and has a unique understanding of the challenges of international terrorism of democracy and freedom and dow money-laundering and political corruption facilitates terror financing and economic terrorism. she is a visiting scholar at the columbia university institute, a research scholar at the new york university school of law and a fellow at john hopkins of the finance international studies and the jesus college at cambridge university. she has a ph.d. in criminology from the hebrew university's school of law. the second speaker is andrew mccarthy the chair from the center of a lot and counter-terrorism. a former federal prosecutor and a contributor at "national review" online and as assistant united states attorney for th
by the following. รงรณ captioning sponsored by rose communications from our sdios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: politico is a website and newspaper dedicated covering all things politics. during last year's historic presidential campaign it emerged as a symbol of the changing face of media. today it has more reporters covering the white house than any other news organization and you may have seen and heard the reporters on television and radio where they make over 100 appearance as a week. >> executive editor of politico jim vandehei. good morning. you wore a jacket. >> once i learned there's a dress code an morning show i was happy to adhere to it. >> let's talk health care. we got into it a little bit in the last segment. nancy pelosi drawing the ire of some democrats. >> the house came out with the bill that the cvo said does not cut health care costs and adds to the deficit and nancy pelosi is under a tremendous amount of pressure from moderate and house democrat. >> charlie: joining me is robert allbritton and executive editor, jim vandehei and the senior politico corresp
night. the association is holding its 100th convention here in new york. the president said african-american children said they must be told they will face challenges unlike other kids who are better off. >> that's not a reason to cut class. that's not a reason to give up an your education and drop out of school. no one has written your destiny for you. your destiny is in your hands. you cannot forget that. that's what we have to teach all of our children. no excuses. >> the president also said that blacks are still feeling the pain of discrimination, despite the many advances that have been made over the past century. >>> mr. obama has doing a lot of talking about health care reform lately. a couple of moderate senators told the president yesterday, that pushing for passage of a reform bill before congress' august recess is an arbitrary deadline. and it may not result in the best product. the president seems to disagree, as jake tapper repor. >> reporter: at a rally in new jersey, president obama continued his health care reform push. >> the health care debate is starting to heat u
the gentleman from new york rise? mr. arcuri: madam speaker, i rise in opposition. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. arcuri: i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. arcuri: this point of order is not about anything other than delaying the passage of this very important bill. and i would say to my friend from arizona that he, himself, has probably received more amendments from the rules committee than the rest of congress put together, so he certainly has had an opportunity to offer many amendments with respect to different earmarks that he feels should be removed from the bill. so i would submit that this point of order is really about delaying the passage of what is a critically important bill, and that is, the transportation appropriation bill, a bill that talks about things like funding roads so we have safe highways, things like high-speed rail so we can bring people and goods from point a to point b as quickly as possible. that's why the consideration of this rule and the passage of this rule is so im
. and if you look at autos as an example, the new york timing has an auto section. they do two stories, too, every week. if you look at the blogs we created about cars, auto blog which are two of the largest car sites on the web, they cover 20 to 40 stories per day. per day. and in each of those stories, there are five to 150 comments. if you're a car enthusiast, by the time the sunday paper comes out, you know everything that's there already. there are no surprises. and that's what's happening is people are looking at the newspaper and how many times have you had this experience. you get the newspaper in the morning and you go -- you look at the front page and you say i saw that on drudge, on the "new york times" and i saw this from an email from my friend and i got this in an email alert and this one twittered this. i try to go through something that i don't already know. >> the printing press since guttenberg, 570 years dictated what publishing could look like. you could do it once a day or week and you would package the world and they value the package that they make. it was going to ha
inappropriate. it could be illegal. >> "the new york times" first reported new cia chief leon mineta found out about the program late last month. he immediately pulled the plug and told congress. >> i will tell you as a member of the intelligence commee we're getting after this and find out what was said because it is disturbing. no doubt about it. >> senator john mccain called for clarity. >> the vice president i think should obviously be heard from if the accusations are leveled in his direction. >> but other gop lawmakers say this seems more like politics than justice. >> this of course comes on the heels of the statement by speaker pelosi that the cia lied to her about enhanced interrogation tactics and this looks to me like an attempt to provide political cover to her and others. >> meanwhile there's reports attorney is launching an independent investigation intoc. i.a. interrogation techniques during the bush era. >> in tonight's education alert, college math professors say maryland public schools are not doing a good enough job teaching basic arith ma tick. nearly half of maryland gradu
. >>> on the "cbs money watch" stocks in tokyo hit a seven-month low this morning. claire leka is in new york. >> tumbling oil prices continue to cavity a gloomy shadow over asia overnight. japan's benchmark nikkei lost nearly 1.5%. but hong kong stocks actually inched up about .33%. on wall street, that tone could improve today after aluminum giant alcoa kicked off second quarter earnings season last night with a narrower than expected loss. the dow jones industrial average tacked on 14. the tech heavy nasdaq added one. nice dry weather came a little too late for retailers last month. wet weather in much of the northeast, including 22 days of rain in new york, probably put a damper on sales of warm weather merchandise. according to the international council of shopping centers, sales of stores open at least a year in june are expected to drop 4.5%. investors will be paying close attention to see if a surge in unemployment to 9.5% and a drop in consumer confidence last month translated into a weaker take at cash registers. >>> meanwhile, the government is expected to report that new claims fo
. in that decision, the court was basically a challenge for the constitutionality of the new york law prohibiting having one of these in your homes. and the heller decision had come down before this case was decided. >> deegan case in the summer of 2008? >> yes, a case in which the supreme court said -- really changed people's understanding of the second amendment establishing new understanding which was giving individuals the right to carry a gun. the issue was a bit of a technical point. it is, the second amendment right barring the federal government from barring a gun also prevent the states? that is a question that was entered a long time ago, i think, 1876. and they said that the no, state governments are not restricted by it. so again, it is a matter of adhering to precedent. judge sotomayor said that until is overruled, the heller decision does not apply. >> does that leave thorny issues ahead? >> as the amendment indicated, the supreme court ruled in the 19th century that the second amendment does not apply against the state. but back then, they've ruled that the entire bill of rights do
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